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Vikings in the Attic author Eric Dregni is Coming to Town

posted Dec 25, 2011, 10:31 PM by Norsk Seattle
Author Eric Dregni will be in the Seattle/Tacoma area in January for book events for his newest book, Vikings in the Attic: In Search of Nordic America
 See below or view the NorskSeattle calendar page for details.

Friday, January 13, 2012
6:00 PM
Pacific Lutheran University
208 Garfield St., Suite 101
Tacoma, WA 98444
Free and open to the public.

Saturday, January 14, 2012
2:00 PM
Nordic Heritage Museum
3014 NW 67th Street
Seattle, WA 98117
Free for Museum members and free with admission for non-members. 

Saturday, January 14, 2012
6:30 PM
Liberty Bay Books
18881 Front St. NE #D
Poulsbo, WA 98370
Free and open to the public.

ABOUT THE BOOK:

In Vikings in the Attic, Eric Dregni tracks down and explores the significant—often bizarre—historic sites, tales, and traditions of Scandinavia’s peculiar colony in the Midwest. Dregni reveals the little-known tales that lie beneath the surface of Nordic America and proves by example why generations of Scandinavian-Americans have come to love and cherish these tales and traditions so dearly.

For more information on Vikings in the Attic
, including the table of contents, visit the book's webpage:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Eric Dregni is assistant professor of English at Concordia University in St. Paul. He is the author of several books, including Minnesota Marvels (2001), Midwest Marvels (2006), In Cod We Trust: Living the Norwegian Dream (2008), and Never Trust a Thin Cook and Other Lessons from Italy’s Culinary Capital (2009), all published by the University of Minnesota Press. During the summer, he is dean of Lago del Bosco, the Italian Concordia Language Village in northern Minnesota. He lives in Minneapolis.

PRAISE FOR VIKINGS IN THE ATTIC:

"While reading Vikings in the Attic, I solved two family mysteries and added at least ten new jokes to my act." —Louie Anderson

"Dregni’s survey is a serious and interesting exploration of why Scandinavians settled in the Upper Midwest." —Star Tribune